Do I need a colonoscopy?

 
Yes
 
No
   
 
 
  Family/personal history of colorectal cancer
 
 
  Family/personal history of colorectal polyps
 
 
  Age 50 or older without symptoms
 
 
  Rectal bleeding (bleeding is never "normal")
 
 
  Abdominal pain

Contact Us

General Information

Call us:  317.841.8090 or 800.872.5123 in Indiana

Our Hours:  Monday - Friday: 8:30am - 4:30pm

We know that with less cutting comes a higher quality of life, reduction of patient costs, and a quicker return to full activity. We wrote the book on minimally invasive colon surgical techniques and our center is Indiana's champion of laparoscopic colon cancer treatment. We offer cutting edge scarless surgeries (single incision laparoscopic surgery or SILS), and robotic surgery (Da Vinci) with the benefit of 3D imaging technologies and greater preservation of sexual function which can be damaged in conventional pelvic procedures.

We embrace new surgical techniques that are proven to result in higher quality of life and less postoperative discomfort. Some exciting up and coming techniques we offer in anorectal surgery include:

artificial sphincter implantation

  • an alternative to colostomy for some patients
  • success rate 70-85%
  • first performed in Indiana by our surgeons

procedure for prolapse and hemorrhoids (PPH)

  • less pain
  • less blood loss
  • less time loss from work

stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR)

  • relieves constipation
  • improves rectal emptying
  • satisfaction rate of 85%
  • first performed in Indiana by our surgeons

transanal endoscopic microsurgery procedure (TEM)

  • avoids need for colostomy
  • shorter recovery time
  • shorter hospitalizations

In colonoscopy, experience makes results and our center has over 50,000 complication-free colonoscopies since 1979. During video inspection of the colon our surgeons can sweep the bowel of polyps (polypectomy), spray vital dyes to reveal cancers (chromoendoscopy), bolster intestinal walls against swelling, constrictions, and blockage (stent placement), clot bleeding vessels, mark tumors for removal and remove contained cancer.

Noninvasive in-house tests and treatments often won't take longer than a lunch break. A patient with hemorrhoids and 20 minutes can shrink their hemorrhoids with the simple application of a band (band ligation) or treatment with a laser (infrared photocoagulation). A 10 minute Botox injection to relax the sphincter stimulates healing of anal fissures. And diagnostic exams can measure anal sensation and muscle pressure (manometry) and image the rectal muscles to pinpoint rectal masses or fistulas (endoanal ultrasound) within half an hour.

Schedule an Appointment

People Helping People

"We believe that those individuals who seek our care should receive the most courteous, compassionate, and current care available. This care should be given with dignity and respect. All of us at Colon & Rectal Care Center seek to give the best, to be the best. One day, each of us may well be seeking care and we will expect no less."

Colon & Rectal Care Physicians
DR. SHAH

Dr. Shah

Dr. Shah studied surgery at an internationally renowned center for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and laparoscopic surgery. He is dedicated to providing minimally invasive options for the treatment of disorders such as colorectal cancer, IBD, and diverticular disease. In his free time he runs, and has done so on four different continents. Although his heart will always be with his hometown Chicago sports teams, he is learning to appreciate our Indianapolis Colts.


Academics

Instructor for international laparoscopic colon surgery course
USMLE Step I-265 99th percentile

Training

Colon and rectal surgery residency: University of Illinois/Cook County Hospital. 2006-8
General surgery residency: Mount Sinai Hospital. 2001-6

Societies

American College of Surgeons
American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons
Indiana State Medical Association


Research & Papers

Papers

  • Marecik SJ, Pearl R, Shah A, Khan K, Evenhouse RJ, Park JJ, Abcarian H, Prasad LM. A lifelike patient simulator for teaching robotic colorectal surgery: How to acquire skills for robotic rectal dissection. Submitted to Surgical Endoscopy April, 2007.
  • Conrad J, Shah A, Schluender S, Divino C, Gurland B, Shlasko E, Szold A. The role of mental rotation and memory scanning on the performance of laparoscopic skills: A study on the effect of camera rotation angle. Surgical Endoscopy 2006; 20:504-10.
  • Fryer JP, Firca J, Levanthal JR, Blondin B, Malcolm A, Ivancic D, Gandhi R, Shah A, Pao W, Abecassis M, Kaufman DB, Stuart F, Anderson B. IgY antiporcine endothelial cell antibodies effectively block human antiporcine xenoantibody binding. Xenotransplantation 1999; 56:98-109

Abstracts & Presentations

  • Shah AH, Edlund JW. Screening for colon neoplasms. PBS Healthline, April, 2008
  • Shah AH, Edlund JW. Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery. PBS Healthline, January, 2008
  • Shah AH, Chaudhry V, Bastawrous A, Cintron JR, Marecik S, Park JJ, Singer M, Prasad LM, Abcarian H. Current experience with the management of rectal foreign bodies. Presented at: Chicago Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons; 2007.
  • Bastawrous A, Shah A, Cintron J. House advancement flap anoplasty for treatment of a mucosal ectropion. Video presentation: American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Annual Meeting; 2007.
  • Shah A. Case of Crohn’s rectovesicular fistula and perineal disease. Presented at: Chicago Society of Colorectal Surgeons; 2006.
  • Shah A, Anderson BA, Leventhal JR, Pao W, Zhang Z, Kaufmann DB, Abecassis M, Stuart F, Fryer JP. Induction of in vitro accommodation of porcine endothelial cells by human anti-agal xenoantibodies. Presented at: The Fifth International Congress for Xenotransplantation; 1999; Nagoya, Japan.
  • Fryer JP, Blondin B, Firca J, Levanthal JR, Zhang Z, Shah A, Pao W, Kaufman DB, Abecassis M, Stuart F, Anderson B. IgY anti-agal antibodies inhibit ADCC of porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAECs). Presented at: The Fifth International Congress for Xenotransplantation; 1999; Nagoya, Japan.
  • Fryer JP, Blondin B, Levental JR, Shah A, Pao W, Kaufman DB, Abecassis M, Stuart FP, Anderson B. Inhibition of antibody-dependent cell-mediated lysis of porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAECs) by preventing FC-FcR binding. Presented at: American Society of Transplant Physicians Eighteenth Annual Scientific Meeting; 1999; Chicago, IL.
  • Fryer JP, Firca J, Shah A, Pao W, Gandhi R, Hong A, Blondin B, Leventhal J, Kaufman D, Abecassis M, Stuart F, Anderson B. Chicken antibodies for the soul—potential blocking antibodies for xenograft rejection? Presented at: 24th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons; 1998; Chicago, IL.
  • Fryer JP, Firca J, Doering S, Stadler K, Roh J, Hong A, Shah A, Blondin B, Leventhal JR, Kaufman DB, Abecassis M, Stuart F, Anderson B. Avian (IgY) antibodies: Reactivity to agal epitopes and blocking of human anti-agal antibodies. The Fourth International Congress for Xenotransplantation; 1997; Nantes, France.
  • Shah A, Gandhi RH, Anderson B, Fryer JP. The potential use of avian antibodies (IgY) to block the human immunological rejection of transplanted porcine organs. Poster session presented at: Northwestern University Medical School Student Research Poster Session; 1998.
  • Shah A, Gandhi RH, Anderson B, Fryer JP. The potential use of avian antibodies (IgY) to block the human immunological rejection of transplanted porcine organs. Presented at: Indian Medical Association Academic Forum; 1997.